IKEA Can’t Prevent Registration of AKEA

Author: Laura K. Johnson

In a recent precedential decision, Inter IKEA Systems B.V. v. Akea, LLC, Opposition No. 91196527 (May 2, 2014), the Trademark Trial and Appeal Board found no likelihood of confusion or dilution between Opposer’s “famous” IKEA mark and Applicant’s AKEA mark for nutritional supplement goods and informational services. This decision demonstrates that even for “famous” marks, similar trademarks may be allowed to coexist if an opposer fails to demonstrate similarities between the goods and services, channels of trade, and degree of consumer care.

In 2009, Akea, LLC (“Akea”) filed an intent-to-use application for the mark AKEA covering: (1) nutritional supplements, herbal supplements, and vitamin and mineral supplements in Class 5, (2) direct solicitation and online retail store services featuring nutritional supplements, herbal supplements, and vitamin and mineral supplements, and providing advice and information in the field of career and business opportunities in Class 35, and (3) providing advice on lifestyle topics of nutrition, diet planning, and nutritional supplements in Class 44. Inter IKEA Systems B.V. (“Ikea”) opposed the application asserting likelihood of confusion and dilution.

For the purpose of its likelihood-of-confusion analysis, the Board found the IKEA mark to be famous for “retail store services in the area of furniture, housewares, and home furnishings,” but not for food products and restaurant services. Turning to the similarities between the parties’ goods, the Board held that Ikea failed to prove that its fruit juice goods were related to Akea’s Class 5 goods. Further, the Board held that Akea’s Class 5 and 44 goods were not inexpensive and, as such, consumers would exercise at least a modest degree of care in their purchasing decisions. Finally, the Board held that Ikea failed to establish that the parties’ goods were offered (or could be offered) in the same trade channels. Based on the record before it, the Board concluded that the fame of the IKEA mark was outweighed by these other factors and found there was no likelihood of confusion with Akea’s Class 5 and 44 goods and services. The Board did find a likelihood of confusion with Akea’s Class 35 services because Akea’s services for “providing advice and information in the field of career and business opportunities” were broad enough to encompass Ikea’s “educational courses and seminars.”

With respect to Ikea’s dilution claim, the Board found that Ikea failed to establish that its IKEA mark was famous and distinctive prior to Akea’s date of constructive use of the AKEA mark. As such, the dilution claim was dismissed.


DISCLAIMER: Although we wish to hear from you, information exchanged in this blog cannot and does not create an attorney-client relationship. Please do not post any information that you consider to be personal or confidential. If you wish for Finnegan, Henderson, Farabow, Garrett & Dunner, LLP to consider representing you, in order to establish an attorney-client relationship you must first enter a written representation agreement with Finnegan. Contact us for additional information. One of our lawyers will be happy to discuss the possibility of representation with you. Additional disclaimer information.

Tagged , , ,

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: